Online style guide

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z
raccoon Link to this term
radiographer Link to this term

takes x-rays ... a radiologist interprets them afterwards

raft Link to this term

Raft has become a popular way to describe a big collection of things, like 'a raft of awards', but it has a subtly ironic tone. Therefore '...following a raft of attacks on Indian students' was a questionable choice of words. Maybe better to pick a more neutral term, like 'number of'.

raft Link to this term

'a raft of awards' is overused ... use many instead

randomised controlled trial Link to this term

not randomised control trial

rap over the knuckles Link to this term

but wrap a parcel

rarefy, rarefies, rarefied Link to this term
rate of knots Link to this term
raze Link to this term

means completely demolish, so 'razed to the ground' is a tautology

razzmatazz Link to this term
re-form Link to this term

we re-form the queue or the band, but reform the outdated policy

real McCoy Link to this term
realpolitik Link to this term
reap Link to this term

reap a reward, or benefit, but wreak havoc or destruction

reason because Link to this term

In 'the reason I'm so cold is because the heating's broken' because is redundant. It should be 'the reason I'm so cold is that the heating's broken.'

reason why Link to this term

In 'the reason why we like mussels is a mystery', why is redundant. It should be 'The reason we like mussels is a mystery.'

reconciled to Link to this term

not with

Red Planet Link to this term

needs caps when used as the nickname referring exclusively to Mars

reek Link to this term

it reeks of corruption, but wreaks havoc

regalia Link to this term

means royal insignia, so 'royal regalia' is a tautology

regardless of Link to this term

irrespective of, not taking into account ... not irregardless—there's no such word.

rein or reign Link to this term

rein in corporate big spenders or horses ... but reigning monarchs

Remembrance Day Link to this term

November 11 in Australia. And not 'rememberence'.

 

rendezvous Link to this term
replaceable Link to this term
report Link to this term

write a report on something, not into. The report often follows an inquiry into or an investigation of something, the results of which are reported on.

reported question Link to this term

In reported speech: It led many to ask what Joe Hockey was hiding from. No question mark. But in direct speech: It led many to ask, 'What is Joe Hockey hiding from?' the question mark is needed.

reported speech v direct quote Link to this term

Never turn the gist of what someone says into a direct quote. If you're not 100% sure of the words they used, then use reported speech like this: The SA resources minister said that he respectfully disagreed with the federal minister. 

reshuffle Link to this term

one word

restaurateur Link to this term

no 'n'

résumé Link to this term

summary, CV (French word normally written with its acute accents to distinguish it from the English word resume)

resuscitation Link to this term
retaliate Link to this term

retaliate against an action, not for.

reticent, reluctant Link to this term

A listener pointed out that reticent (defined by the Macquarie dictionary as 'disposed to be silent, not inclined to speak freely; reserved) is sometimes used where reluctant ('unwilling, disinclined') is called for. So 'When asked for his source he was reticent' is correct, but 'He was reticent to divulge his source' is not. We should say 'He was reluctant to divulge his source.'

revert Link to this term

means go back, so never 'revert back'

review Link to this term

conduct a review of something

revue Link to this term

theatrical entertainment ... review is the criticism of it

rhetoric Link to this term
rhetorical v grammatical punctuation Link to this term

'Today's Jewel in the Crown, is a work in fibreglass by Peter Corlett...' This is an example of rhetorical punctuation. The comma has been put where one might pause for emphasis when reading aloud. But grammatically it doesn't make sense, because we don't put a single comma between a subject and its verb. For online publication we need to make sense grammatically, so we write: 'Today's Jewel in the Crown is a work in fibreglass by Peter Corlett.'

Rice, Condoleezza Link to this term
rich as Croesus Link to this term
ricochet, ricocheted, ricocheting Link to this term
rift Link to this term

a rift is usually healed, not reconciled. People are reconciled, and the act of reconciliation may heal a rift.

right wing, the Link to this term

of a political party

right-wing politician Link to this term
rite of passage Link to this term

not to be confused with right of way

rock and roll Link to this term

three words, or rock'n'roll, three words contracted to one

Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Link to this term
Roebourne Prison, Western Australia Link to this term
roller-coaster Link to this term

cliche: 'emotional roller-coaster' etc, and beware the mixed metaphor. There's only one thing you can do with a roller-coaster, emotional or otherwise, and that's ride it. You can't battle through it or be battered by it.

Rollerblade Link to this term

trademark, so capitalise

Roman numerals Link to this term

Joseph P Kennedy 111 means there have been 110 Joseph P Kennedys before this one. What the writer meant was Joseph P Kennedy III, the Roman numeral traditionally used to mean 'the third'. Use upper-case i, not numeral 1. 
I, II, III, IV, V, VI, VII, VIII, IX, X...

 

 

roof, roofs Link to this term

not rooves

Rorschach test Link to this term

interpretation of inkblots

Rottnest Island Link to this term

off Western Australia, home to the quokka

round-up (noun), round up (verb) Link to this term

We bring you a round-up of the news. We round up the news to bring you this round-up.

royal commissions Link to this term

capitalise only when citing the full title of a particular royal commission. For the federal government's royal commission to examine institutional child sexual abuse, the official title is Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sex Abuse. The chief commissioner is Peter McClellan AM.

runner-up Link to this term

runners-up (plural)

russian roulette Link to this term

no caps

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z