Online style guide

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Hague, The Link to this term

it's always 'The Hague', never 'Hague' or 'the Hague'.

halcyon Link to this term
hale Link to this term

and hearty, hail a taxi

hallelujah Link to this term
Halley's comet Link to this term
hallowed ground Link to this term

not hollowed

hallucinogen, hallucinogenic Link to this term
hanged, hung Link to this term

people are hanged, pictures hung

hanging participles Link to this term

'Born in Hobart in 1909, his daughter Rory has now donated her father's memorabilia to the Tasmanian Museum...' That would make Rory 99—not unreasonable except this is the second paragraph of a story about Errol Flynn and his daughter Rory. Much better to repeat the name: Errol Flynn was born in Hobart in 1909, and his daughter Rory has now donated her father's...etc.

hara-kiri Link to this term
harass, harassment Link to this term
hard line, hardline Link to this term

The premier took a hard line on the proposed tax. What kind of line? Hard. The minister proposed a hardline policy. What kind of policy? Hardline.

harebrained Link to this term
haybaling Link to this term

not bailing

head-to-head Link to this term
heading or headed? Link to this term

'Is Australia heading (not headed) for a hung parliament?' Best to avoid 'headed' here because its use as anything other than the past tense of the verb 'to head' is hard to justify in Australian usage.

heading to Link to this term

please consider using other verbs such as going, travelling, flying. 'Heading to' is overused.

headings Link to this term

please use newspaper headline style, with the first word capitalised but the rest lower-cased. 'Lebanon update', not 'Lebanon Update'; 'Live concert from Port Fairy', not 'Live Concert From Port Fairy'.

Hedland, Port Link to this term

town in Pilbara Region of Western Australia

heinous crime Link to this term
hello Link to this term

not hullo or hallo

Hepburn, Katharine Link to this term

not Katherine

heyday Link to this term

one word

hi-tech Link to this term
hierarchy Link to this term
Higgs boson Link to this term

lower-case b

highly or widely Link to this term

highly or widely educated, but widely (not highly) read

Hillary Clinton Link to this term
Hills hoist Link to this term
hip hop Link to this term

no capitals, no hyphen

hip pocket Link to this term

hip-pocket nerve

historic, historical Link to this term

the fall of the Berlin Wall was a historic event, but most public libraries hold historical documents

history repeating itself Link to this term

'More than one million people died in that famine and now there are fears that history could be repeating.' Propellerheads and Shirley Bassey have made 'history repeating' stick in our brains, but in a serious discussion of world hunger we should write '...history could be repeating itself.'

HIV Link to this term

Human immunodeficiency virus which may lead to AIDS (acquired immune deficiency syndrome)

hoi polloi Link to this term

the masses, the people (it doesn't mean high and mighty, which is hoity-toity

hoist with [one's] own petard Link to this term
hoity-toity Link to this term

snobbish, haughty

hokey-cokey Link to this term

the dance

hokey-pokey Link to this term

hocus pocus, or trickery, or brittle toffee in New Zealand

hold fast Link to this term

to your sanity

holdfast Link to this term

a clamping device

holey Link to this term

full of holes (holy, holiness is spiritual excellence)

holier-than-thou Link to this term

self-righteous

Holy Grail Link to this term
home in on Link to this term
homophone Link to this term

'...she's 22 and just one her first Aria...' It's surprising what the brain can do when you're writing in a rush, but here's an example found on the RN site.

homophones Link to this term

when words sound the same but have different meanings.  Voice recognition software uses 'contextual clues' to cope with common homophones but we all slip up occasionally.

Tags: 
hone your skills Link to this term
horde, hordes Link to this term

of people ... a hoard of treasure

hors d'oeuvre Link to this term

(singular and plural)

hotdog Link to this term

one word

hotel Link to this term

a hotel—and all other words beginning with H where the H is pronounced. So it's a historian, a historic occasion, but an honour, an heir.

house style Link to this term

Please follow the ten main house style points below if you are publishing copy to the RN website.

hullaballoo Link to this term
hummus Link to this term

the purée

humour, humorous, humorist Link to this term

If you're writing in America you use humor. In Australia it's still definitely humour. But just to be contrary, it's humorist and humorous everywhere.

humus Link to this term

the rotted vegetation

hurly-burly Link to this term
hyphens Link to this term

never after adverbs ending in -ly, as in 'fully financed', 'partly paid' (but part-paid does need one). Hyphens are useful to clarify meaning: a big cat-lover is not the same as a big-cat lover.

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